Message from the founder

Translation is a bit like coffee:
– It’s been around for centuries
– There is of different quality
– People always look for the best
– Only few give it recognition
– Some think it’s not worth the hype
But we still drink it. And want more.
@rainylondon

I long got used to the surprise on many people’s faces when I am asked about my profession. I always joyfully answer: “Translator!”
Then I read the familiar questions in their eyes:
“What kind of profession is this?”
“What do you translate to make a living?”

Back when I graduated from the university with a degree in Russian and Bulgarian language and literature, I also had no idea that translations could make money. That time was known as the hungry 90s. After the collapse, the former citizens of the USSR worked wherever they could to feed themselves. I was lucky enough at the time to get a job as an assistant at the Chair of Russian Language and Literature at my home university. By the time of my hiring to this once honorary position, only its name remained so. My lofty responsibilities included the following:

1) opening the office for the lecturers of the Chair in the morning, who, for some reason, would go there long before the classes started and in between them (probably, an old habit from the warm and well-fed years when they held meetings and chatted away in their free time from teaching),

2) sitting for half a day in a jacket and boots in an unheated office, as this state institution simply did not have money for heating,

3) after finishing classes, locking the office door and going home.

The monthly salary was enough for one very modest trip to the store, and I wondered where else to possibly earn some money. Once, when I was walking along the main street of Chișinău, I saw a sign “Translation Agency.” Since I was already intensively studying the English language at that time, I thought, why not try my luck. The agency was not interested in my English, but the Bulgarian caused a lively reaction. A few days later, I received my first job – a translation of a small official certificate from Russian to Bulgarian. Imagine my surprise when I received a payment equal to my monthly salary. It made me feel like a real winner! This was not some random lottery ticket that anyone can draw, not money that I came by the road. It was a reward for five years of study and knowledge that seemed fruitless all those years. I felt like a sorceress who does things that only a few can.

Many years have passed since then, and my story moved on. I immigrated to Canada, where I became a reputable and sought-after translator who works in English, Russian, Bulgarian and Ukrainian. The feeling of magic is not lost on me all these years since. The threads from one language’s words are intertwined and form a carpet of words and expressions of another language. Line by line, and now the fingers running across the keyboard weaved a whole necklace of words.

People ask me if I’m tired of this sedentary job. And I always answer that this is not just a way to make money. It is a whole universe of topics to explore, from science and travel, medicine, and the strict language of the law and beyond. It is endless, like life.